Ship operators cannot cut corners on safety – IMO Scribe, Kitack Lim

Kitack Lim, Secretary General of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) has said that ship operators cannot gain advantage by simply cutting corners and compromising on safety, security and environmental performance.
He noted that all IMO measures cover all aspects of international shipping – including ship design, construction, equipment, manning, operation and disposal – to create a level playing field for all operators by ensuring that shipping sector remains safe, environmentally sound, energy efficient and secure.
The Secretary General stated this in a paper he delivered recently at the conference of staff of the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) in Lisbon, Portugal.
According to him, “We create a level playing-field so that ship operators cannot gain advantage by simply cutting corners and compromising on safety, security and environmental performance. IMO measures cover all aspects of international shipping – including ship design, construction, equipment, manning, operation and disposal – to ensure that this vital sector remains safe, environmentally sound, energy efficient and secure.
“IMO’s regulatory framework is reflected in national and regional legislation for shipping all over the world – including the EU. Indeed, the EU member states are crucial to the work of IMO. Individually and collectively, EU member states have made an invaluable contribution to our work to enhance safety, security and to protect the environment.
“Over several decades, IMO regulations and technical standards have laid the foundation for shipping to become progressively safer, more efficient, cleaner and greener. Statistics for maritime casualties and pollution incidents clearly attest to this.
“And, as you would expect from a group with such a strong tradition of maritime experience and expertise, the EU countries have been among the prime movers in this. And, beyond that, EU countries have an equally strong influence over ensuring that IMO measures are universally adopted and implemented. Given the number and combined fleet size of the EU countries, EU ratifications can bring most measures close to, or beyond, the entry-into-force point. The EU can also exert a great deal of influence globally by ensuring compliance among your own national fleets and among non-EU ships that sail in your waters and enter your ports.
“The relationship between global regulation, through IMO, and regional implementation can be strong, and very effective. And EMSA, in particular, has made, and continues to make, a very positive and active contribution to such synergy.”

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*